Clicking innovation together

Even when you think you understand innovation, you probably don’t. Not really.

I’ve been working with teams in the automotive industry for many years now. In some cases with startups trying to disrupt a part of the mobility ecosystem, in other cases with worldwide leaders of this market. Right now, I’m even in charge of focusing the go-to-market efforts of a group of startups in a transversal incubation program purely on mobility. I can’t say that I know these markets inside out, but I’ll admit that I start to have a fair grasp on what drives innovation around – pun intended. Continue reading “Clicking innovation together”

Writing your corporate incubation playbook – Part 2

The second article on how to build a tailor-made corporate incubation program deals with the ‘BUSINESS’ revenue of such an initiative.

To follow up on our last article on your corporate incubation playbook, we’ll explore further the ROI architecture of such a program, starting with the “business” revenue. Continue reading “Writing your corporate incubation playbook – Part 2”

Writing your corporate incubation playbook – Part 1

This series of articles will try to unpack and lay out the conceptual and technical tools required to design an effective corporate incubation program.

After years of strain and pressure from new digital opportunities that passed by, multinational corporations seem to have found  their innovation mojo back. Their idea has been incredibly simple after all: let’s embrace the strategies that created Uber-like challengers out of nowhere. By creating your own disruption engine — and keep it under control — you will finally outrun all these puny startups, and find new business models of your own.  Continue reading “Writing your corporate incubation playbook – Part 1”

The only four problems that innovators can solve

Innovation is a high-speed play field. To survive and strive in it you need find the right short-cuts. Here is a simple way to deal with “understanding the market problem”.

Running a regular business is not a simple thing, but it’s at least well documented and can be taught in various ways. It’s comparable to classical mechanics. Innovation on the other hand is the quantum physics of classical business. When its counter-intuitiveness has been laid out for you, you immediately feel like you get it. Then you need to get involved in it and you realize that you just don’t get it. Continue reading “The only four problems that innovators can solve”

Car manufacturers are the new Nokia

For anyone seriously involved in innovation, it’s stunning to realize that the industry learned nothing from early 2000’s Nokia. Regarding the car industry, people still think of it as a hardware business. It’s all about the car, the engine, the brakes, the dashboard, the performance, the security, the comfort. We barely register that vehicles are now being hacked into, that accidents happen because of dozens of millions of lines of code that make a modern suburban vehicle today, or that mapping, geolocalization, and communications are now indispensable. Continue reading “Car manufacturers are the new Nokia”

Startups are Schrödinger’s cats

Understanding the core nature of startup ventures is not so easy. Unless you already understand quantum mechanics.

Among the fundamental misunderstandings that I try to tackle from time to time in these articles, many of them revolve around the fact that a startup is not « a smaller version of a larger company ».  This single point is the source of the vast majority of all the problems encountered by startups when they have to do anything about their project. Whether they have to think strategically or react to an emergency, they activate neuronal pathways that have been formed whilst learning from — or working with — typical companies. Continue reading “Startups are Schrödinger’s cats”