The keys to avoid mentoring matches hell

Three key success criteria of creating mentoring matches and how they are impacted by the various forms of matching.

So you’ve started a mentoring programme, and managed to create some mentor-mentee pairs… After a few months you notice that some pairs are ok, some others or even many others are not seeing each other regularly, or even haven’t gone passed the first meeting. It may be a sign that the match is not a good fit, but it may not only be due to conflicting personalities, your matching process may be the problem.  Continue reading “The keys to avoid mentoring matches hell”

An unexpected summer reading list for innovators

You may not think that reading about traditional Japanese arts, or architecture, could help you innovate. You’d be wrong.

I was recently asked by too many people to produce a reading list for this summer to really be able to refuse gracefully. Now, this is not a simple matter. To some extent, my straightforward answer would be: read everything about innovation that has been published in these last 20 years, that is not purely redundant, and then… forget it all. Continue reading “An unexpected summer reading list for innovators”

The rationality of approximation

We all think that we are rational beings, but what if you shouldn’t be? Or more precisely, what if you shouldn’t share the same rationality as overs?

The innovation playfield is constantly flooded with vague concepts, buzzwords or ill-defined theories. In the end, we all start to use the same interchangeable lingo and shout instructions to our teams, or our customers, that we do not comprehend anymore. Such a key instruction that you’ll find in any innovation book is: be agile. Depending on where you read it, it will be wrapped differently. Accept risk. Keep it lean. Embrace risk. Leverage serendipity. Focus on effectuation. Be opportunistic. Pivot when necessary. Move fast, break things. Continue reading “The rationality of approximation”

Where to launch a startup in Europe after the Brexit

Indisputably London will be less of a European hub for startups in the next 2-3 years. Where should you go now?

Sure it’s been a shock, and in the few years, Cameron will probably enter history books as the guy that fumbled his country out of the European Community. While nothing is really done yet, and the actual Brexit could drag on and on if no actual leadership comes back to Britain, it may be the time to ask what Brexit changes for European startups. Continue reading “Where to launch a startup in Europe after the Brexit”

To know if Apple is doomed or not

‘Apple is doomed’ is a recurring mantra of tech / business analysts. Should we buy this omen in the perspective of the WWDC 2016 keynote?

To wrap up 2015 fiscal year, Tim COOK tried to put in perspective the growth of his company:

To put that into some context, our growth in one year was greater than the full year revenue of almost 90% of the companies in the Fortune 500.

For the market and business analysts at wide, this is utterly frightening, and there is this on-going narrative of “Apple is doomed”. Continue reading “To know if Apple is doomed or not”

When corporates meet startups

Corporations have a new-found love for startups, and they broadcast it as loudly as possible in all medias. Why is that such a dumb idea to start with, and how to adjust?

As a quick follow-up on my first two articles on corporate innovation (part 1 and part 2), I’ll be presenting a keynote on the relation between startups and corporations in Europe, for companies in the mobility market. Continue reading “When corporates meet startups”